Wednesday, September 30, 2009

ACK! It's actually STILL on!

It was too easy, too logical, for it to be true. And it wasn't.

QVegas associate publisher Earl Shelton canceled his public nuptials at the Erotic Heritage Museum, but evidently some other couples are still moving forward with this horrible idea of marking the commencement of the new domestic partnership law with ceremonies at a sex museum officiated by an Elvis and, maybe, featuring drag-queen nuns.

Laura Henkel, the museum's curator, wrote this comment on the prior post:

Steve,I'm really glad you raised valid points. The event is still happening tonight. There were other couples who were going to participate in the celebrations. Earl backed out due to public pressure. I don't know if the Sisters are participating are not. People from various communities are showing up at 3pm at EHM to discuss what is indeed happening tonight. Jesse Garon does not own the Erotic Wedding Chapel exhibit as it is one of the exhibits at the Museum. Jessie Garon is going to overseeing commitment ceremonies at the Museum. He currently runs The Knot at the Plaza Hotel. I look forward to meeting you in person soon. Best, Laura

That's just swell, Laura. You've now officially proven yourself more concerned with your own bottom line and publicity than for what is obviously right for the community you claim to support. The best answer, if you must follow through, is to not allow media to cover it, period. But then what good would that do you, huh? And how will you repair the damage when this footage ends up being used against us to scare the bejesus out of straight people? You seem to believe you know something about marriage equality politics that those who study these things for a living don't.

It's shameful. The museum people may have started out trying to mix good business with good intentions, but when it has been clearly explained to them and they still persist to follow through, there's only one explanation: Greed.

P.S. I'm quite certain Garon told me this was his idea because he was the owner of the chapel at the museum. So now I'm confused but I'll take Laura's word for that.

13 comments:

atdnext said...

And has the museum thought about what happens if this story goes national? Remember that our LGBT comrades in Maine and Washington are facing close election fights over their own civil rights this year. The very last thing I want to see happen is NOM using our tacky DP celebration tonight to ruin Mainers' chances of getting marriage equality and Washingtonians' chances of getting similar comprehensive DPs.

Yeah, the Erotic Heritage Museum is shortsighted indeed. Is one day of good PR for them worth many thousands of LGBT families possibly losing their civil rights in November?

Anonymous said...

So, just to get this straight, obviously you support gay marriage/domestic partnerships, but only in so much as they are done tastefully? You (and everyone else, on either side of this museum debate) cannot micromanage the image of gay marriage. Not in the media and not to the world. It's just not plausible.

People shouldn't be afraid or ashamed to have the kind of ceremony they want or would enjoy because it would damage the community and potentially "get out." I'm sure there are thousands, millions even, of more damaging materials that can be chopped up and used in a commercial. And you know what? If the anti-gay protestors don't get their hands on this footage (because it doesn't exist), they'll doctor something to look like it, if that's what they need. Stopping a celebration isn't going to help.

I understand that you're viewing this as a publicity stunt, but you let thousands of publicity stunts go unchecked in this town daily. And arguing that this will affect the gay community of The Entire World or whatever, is far-fetched, at best.

It seems you're just in it to wear your crusader cape today because if you stepped back, I think the unfoundedness of your assertions would be clear. Yes, it's to drum up publicity, yes, it's meant to affect the bottom line, but it's also not the crippling blow to the gay community that you're proporting it to be.

Let people have their fun. What are you fighting for if not to let people enjoy things their own way? If, when granted the right to vote, women voted for the incumbent so as not to create an atmosphere of, "Look! Loony women vote for this guy! He's awful and this is why the shouldn't be allowed to vote in the first place!" no actual change could ever be accomplished.

laura said...

I am Dr. Ted McIlvenna, the Curator of the Erotic Heritage Museum and the founder of the Exodus Trust. I am United Methodist Minister who was assigned by the church years ago to bring sanity to people's sick view of sex. You have said some very bad things about a group of people that have donated their time and their money to put together an important historical event in this City.
I came over to lend them my appreciation and support. I am sorry that you have decided to treat history as a fiction. There is no greed involved. The Museum has cost many millions of dollars and must continue to rely on the support and subsidy like all quality Museums. It is our hope that the people of Las Vegas and the people who come to visit this wonderful City will come to value and appreciate our great erotic heritage.

Anonymous said...

what's really outrageous is the gawker post that doesn't even mention steve's name. that's gotta burn you up steve. you deserve to be named and recognized by gawker and all other media for your courageous stance(s).

atdnext said...

I don't think any of us are opposed to people deciding to do weddings however they like. I'm just concerned about the museum using this to get press coverage that could ultimately be used against the LGBT community both here in Nevada and outside the state where Maine and Washington are facing tough elections this year.

I just don't want bad press from one event to help our bigoted and hateful opponents in stripping away our civil rights.

Jay said...

If straight people will suddenly be scared by this then they have always been afraid of gay people. You will never change their mind no matter how a ceremony is done. I understand the issue here, but for most of us straight people that have no issue with who gets married how, this won't matter. It's those that are already opposed to gay marriage or whatever you want to call it that will.

Michael said...

I don't have any horse in the race. I understand your position Steve and can respect it. But I also know that ultimately gay marriage or any marriage and choice has to be however those engaging in it choose to be. I'm a bit torn even in my note on this, I started where I wanted to say I thought you were being overzealous, but I did find a comparison I think helps state your point as a reference without being construed as heavy handed in the criticism, which I think your passion for the issue maybe showing a bit in your criticism.

I think an analogy of Jackie Robinson would be beneficial here, when he came up with the Dodgers as the first African American ballplayer in MLB. He did so with quiet reserved, dignity and professionalism. If he hadn't perhaps the color barrier wouldn't have been broken in the same manner that it was.

Matthew said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
THE STRIP PODCAST said...

Matthew: One more time now. People can do whatever they want whenever they want however they want so long as they don't claim to the world they are representing a large group of others who never had a say in the matter. If I have a faggot-ass voice, that's my voice and that's that. But this was an orchestrated, politically tone-deaf spectacle by people who wanted the press and the public to believe they represented all of us. And the damage of it would have been tangible, long-lasting and expensive. And I'm not the only one who came to that conclusion.

THE STRIP PODCAST said...

Matthew: One more time now. People can do whatever they want whenever they want however they want so long as they don't claim to the world they are representing a large group of others who never had a say in the matter. If I have a faggot-ass voice, that's my voice and that's that. But this was an orchestrated, politically tone-deaf spectacle by people who wanted the press and the public to believe they represented all of us. And the damage of it would have been tangible, long-lasting and expensive. And I'm not the only one who came to that conclusion.

Mathew said...

I totaly see your point steven but still the irony of the situation is purddy funny. What one man (you) thinks a wedding should consist of is why these people are not getting married tonight at an event that is celebrating not being judge by how people choose to handle their comitments.

And don't loose your gay voice!

Anonymous said...

I'm not gay, or even bi (much to my boyfriend's chagrin), but I looked forward to and attended the event at the Erotic Heritage Museum last night.

It was slightly disappointing that there were no commitment ceremonies to commemorate Domestic Partnerships in Nevada.

I've never been married, nor do I actually ever plan to be. But I was thrilled that I now have the opportunity to enter into a Domestic Partnership should I choose to do so. A partnership that would give me the same rights and responsibilities as a spouse.

I have been a supporter of gay rights for over 20 years and am, myself, a member of a community that is discriminated against by mainstream America.

As a pagan (read witch) who is out to the world at large, I have to deal with being misunderstood and maligned. But it is a choice that I made that has put me here.

I have grandchildren that I rarely get to see who live in Las Vegas, less than 5 miles from my home, because of my choices.

But enough about that.

I was thrilled to see the turn out at the Erotic Heritage Museum's event and pleased by the dialog that I witnessed (and participated in) between members of multiple communities who came together for a celebration.

You should have been there, Steve. At least then you might be able to write knowledgably about this joyous occasion.

Kimber, the wicked witch of Las Vegas

Anonymous said...

its nice that such a wonderful day can be spoiled by people who feel celebrating the long-anticipated rights of fellow citizens is tacky.

its always a refreshing reminder that people are cruel, selfish, and bigoted enough to force their opinions and lifestyle on others because these people represent a world I want no part of. thanks for reminding me there are truly mean-spirited assholes in the world.

uncle al